Radiometric dating of the siloam tunnel jerusalem Free adult chat lines texas

18-Sep-2016 06:23

Hezekiah’s Tunnel, part of Jerusalem’s water system, is located under the City of David.

It connects the Gihon Spring—Jerusalem’s fresh water supply—with the Siloam Pool.

While most scholars attribute the Siloam Inscription to the Iron Age II, John Rogerson and Philip Davies argue that it is actually Hasmonean, which raises the question: Which period is a better fit for the Siloam Inscription?

As described in the Siloam Inscription, Hezekiah’s Tunnel was dug by two teams, who worked in opposite directions and met in the middle, to prepare for the invasion of Sennacherib.

: “As for the other events of Hezekiah’s reign, all his achievements and how he made the pool and the tunnel by which he brought water into the city, are they not written in the book of the annals of the kings of Judah?

”[3] Since the inscription does not commit itself to a specific deity or reigning monarch at the time of its dedication, Simon Parker argues that while King Hezekiah may have commissioned the tunnel (as the biblical record states), the inscription was most likely written independently of the royal scribes and “that the inscription was produced by or for the ‘civil engineer’ who planned and supervised the project…he would have been proudest of the measurements, and he would have been most interested in recording these things and most anxious that such a record be inconspicuous and that his name not be displayed on it.”[4] Indeed the inscription remained well hidden in its dim location a few meters inside the tunnel etched around the height of the waterline.

In contrast to that, the previous water system did release all the water not used by the city population into the Kidron Valley to the east, where besieging troops could have taken advantage of it.

The curving tunnel is 533 m long, and by using the 30 cm altitude difference between its two ends, which corresponds to a 0.06 percent gradient, the engineers managed to convey the water from the spring to the pool.

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While some are poorly preserved or hard to identify, others are off limits to scientists because of political reasons.

A young boy wades through Hezekiah’s Tunnel, the most famous of the Jerusalem tunnels.

The image brings to mind the discovery of the Siloam Inscription—located at the southern end of Hezekiah’s Tunnel—by a youth in 1880.

With the ancient Hebrew text heavily obscured by lime and the difficulty on the part of the decipherer to discriminate between cracks in the rock and actual letters, the first attempt at translating the inscription proved fruitless.

Nonetheless word of the discovery spread around Jerusalem, and in the following year of 1881, A. Sayce endeavored to forge a revised transcribing of the Siloam Inscription after applying an acid to remove the lime and a series of squeezes were lifted of the text.[2] The Siloam Inscription differs greatly from a typical dedication of a building project from the region and time period, as it makes no mention of a king that commissioned the undertaking in the first place, contrary to the biblical account of King Hezekiah in 2 Kgs.

While some are poorly preserved or hard to identify, others are off limits to scientists because of political reasons.A young boy wades through Hezekiah’s Tunnel, the most famous of the Jerusalem tunnels.The image brings to mind the discovery of the Siloam Inscription—located at the southern end of Hezekiah’s Tunnel—by a youth in 1880.With the ancient Hebrew text heavily obscured by lime and the difficulty on the part of the decipherer to discriminate between cracks in the rock and actual letters, the first attempt at translating the inscription proved fruitless.Nonetheless word of the discovery spread around Jerusalem, and in the following year of 1881, A. Sayce endeavored to forge a revised transcribing of the Siloam Inscription after applying an acid to remove the lime and a series of squeezes were lifted of the text.[2] The Siloam Inscription differs greatly from a typical dedication of a building project from the region and time period, as it makes no mention of a king that commissioned the undertaking in the first place, contrary to the biblical account of King Hezekiah in 2 Kgs.Both the spring itself, and the pool at the end of the tunnel, would have been used by the inhabitants as water sources.