Updating fedora kernel

14-Aug-2016 14:34

Through the last kernel updates in the past months, I was using the proprietary (!) NVIDIA driver package here: was using the 64Bit Long Lived Branch version (recent 375.39), with this recent fix I switched over to the 64Bit Short Lived Branch version (378.13).Version 1.0 Author: Falko Timme Each distribution has some specific tools to build a custom kernel from the sources.This article is about compiling a kernel on Fedora systems.After the last kernel update a few weeks ago, when SELinux broke a lot installations while preventing NVIDIA drivers (and some other drivers) to be loaded, my fix there was to simply reinstall the NVIDIA driver package. 'make' -j8 NV_EXCLUDE_BUILD_MODULES='' KERNEL_UNAME=4.10.8-200.fc25.x86_64 modules... So what I did next, was to remove the NVIDIA driver package using the rm -f /usr/lib/lib * /usr/lib/lib * rm -f /usr/lib/xorg/modules/extensions/dnf re-install xorg-x11-server-Xorg mesa-lib GL mesa-lib EGL mv /etc/X11//etc/X11/saved The installation ran through and but I wasn't able to boot up my Fedora installation as it would again got stuck in the boot process.Running the recent NVIDIA installer package, which I use to keep in both last versions on my machine as backups, led to the following errors: Failed to run /usr/sbin/dkms build -m nvidia -v 378.13 -k 4.10.8-200x86_64: Kernel preparation unnecessary for this kernel. The output of cat /var/log/Xorg.0did mention the shutdown of the xorg server but this seemed to be an old log. I also checked dmesg output as usually and couldn't find anything related.It describes how to build a custom kernel using the latest unmodified kernel sources from kernel) so that you are independent from the kernels supplied by your distribution.

Each release offers several new features and improvements that a lot of people could take advantage of to make their computing experience faster, more efficient, or better in other ways.

Your distribution constantly asks you to update your kernel....

Disclaimer: As some of our literature may have mentioned before, updating your kernel does carry a (small) risk of breaking your system.

If this is the case, it’s usually easy to pick an older kernel at boot time that works, but something may always go wrong.

Therefore, we’re not responsible for any damage to your system — use at your own risk!

Each release offers several new features and improvements that a lot of people could take advantage of to make their computing experience faster, more efficient, or better in other ways.

Your distribution constantly asks you to update your kernel....

Disclaimer: As some of our literature may have mentioned before, updating your kernel does carry a (small) risk of breaking your system.

If this is the case, it’s usually easy to pick an older kernel at boot time that works, but something may always go wrong.

Therefore, we’re not responsible for any damage to your system — use at your own risk!

[...] If you're using Workstation, the offline update system is expressly designed to minimize the likelihood of this kind of problem, so please do consider using it.