Updating plumbing in a home

02-Jul-2016 08:03

Remove existing piping between utility meter and all fixtures.Replace, secure and test new piping, fixture shutoff valves. Apply basic patch to any damaged wall/surface access points. Includes planning, equipment and material acquisition, area preparation and protection, setup and cleanup.We agree with the plumbers and contractors you've consulted - up to a point.The low water pressure is the main clue that your pipes need to be replaced.If your house is old enough to have galvanized water pipes, they could be contaminating your water.Until 1986, manufacturers used naturally occuring zinc that contained impurities such as lead in the galvanizing process.That in itself is a powerful reason for replacing the pipes, but there is another.Galvanized steel pipes tend to corrode from the inside, and the corrosion gradually reduces the internal cross-section and restricts waterflow.

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That's because most of the piping used pre-1960s was galvanized steel, the bane of old-house plumbing.

Worse, the bad galvanized pipe may have been replaced with more galvanized pipe instead of copper or plastic pipe, meaning the problem has just been extended, rather than cured.

It's difficult to determine the entire plumbing picture, since most of the system is behind walls.

Also, we would like to remodel our kitchens (we don't have dishwashers) and have been told that we wouldn't get the full benefit of new appliances with old plumbing. We've had several contractors and plumbers talk to us about replacing the plumbing. We don't see why the kitchens and baths need to be gutted to do it. Galvanized water piping was the state of the plumbing art in 1941.

The latest contractor told us we'd basically have to replace our kitchens and bathrooms because they'd have to tear into so many walls to replace the plumbing. Galvanizing is a metallurgical process used over the past 150 years to coat steel or iron with zinc to inhibit corrosion.

That's because most of the piping used pre-1960s was galvanized steel, the bane of old-house plumbing.

Worse, the bad galvanized pipe may have been replaced with more galvanized pipe instead of copper or plastic pipe, meaning the problem has just been extended, rather than cured.

It's difficult to determine the entire plumbing picture, since most of the system is behind walls.

Also, we would like to remodel our kitchens (we don't have dishwashers) and have been told that we wouldn't get the full benefit of new appliances with old plumbing. We've had several contractors and plumbers talk to us about replacing the plumbing. We don't see why the kitchens and baths need to be gutted to do it. Galvanized water piping was the state of the plumbing art in 1941.

The latest contractor told us we'd basically have to replace our kitchens and bathrooms because they'd have to tear into so many walls to replace the plumbing. Galvanizing is a metallurgical process used over the past 150 years to coat steel or iron with zinc to inhibit corrosion.

But we wouldn't be surprised if you have seen some discolored water when you turn on a faucet you've not used in awhile.